Supporters and Opponents of Ted Wheeler's Proposed Commission Square Off

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Fri, 08/04/2017 - 5:00pm to 5:30pm
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Mayor Ted Wheeler’s plan for a new commission to promote an improved relationship between police and the community came under attack at yesterday’s city council meeting.  The mayor, who also serves as the Portland Police Commissioner, raised concerns that it would cut the rest of the city council out of any oversight role.

The Multnomah County Joint Office for Homelessness has announced a temporary halt to homeless sweeps during the current heat wave.  With temperatures consistently above 90 degrees, the authority said that clean-up crews will only be targeting camps that are in “Dangerous right-of-ways.” Otherwise, they will not be asking most people move, so they can remain shaded and save energy.  A number of homeless Portlanders lost their lives during this winter’s period of extreme cold, and the city has asked residents to treat the heat wave with the same urgency that you would the cold.  They point out that the heat may not seem quite as dangerous, but the homeless are still vulnerable to heat stroke and exhaustion.  If you see someone in medical distress, you are urged to call 911. Call 211, if you see someone not in immediate danger, but who needs a ride to a cooling center or other help. Outreach works are carrying extra water, and have asked residents to be on the lookout for anyone suffering signs of heat stroke or heat related distress.

Beijing has long had the reputation of having some of the world’s most polluted air.  But according to Oregon’s Environmental Quality Department, Portland had the dubious honor of having the worst air quality in the U.S.  It was even worse than Beijing,  Early in the week, the Department warned that the air quality was unhealthful for children, senior citizens and people with respiratory diseases.  Yesterday they expanded the warning to “Unhealthy for Everyone.”  The increased pollution is primarily the result of forest fires that are blazing across British Columbia. The foul air is also coinciding with a record heat wave throughout the Pacific Northwest. Temperatures were in the high 90’s early in the week and set records of 103 on Wednesday and 105 yesterday.  Forecasters say that the worst of the heat wave is over, but daytime highs will probably continue in the mid 90’s for the next week or so.  But a drop to 95 is not what most Portlanders would refer to as a cooling trend.  Along with the lower temperatures, forecasters predict that an increase in westerly winds will start blowing out some of the smoke.

 

 

 

Transcription of Today's Evening News: 

 

>>Andre Louis. Andre, we wish you the very best and thank you so much for your contributions and your work here at Democracy Now. You made us so much better. Democracy Now is produced by Mike Burke, Deena Guzder, Nermeen Shaikh, Carla Wills, Laura Gottesdiener, Sam Alcoff, John Hamilton, Robby Karran, [unintelligible] ...Special thanks to Becca Staley, Julie Crosby, Hugh GranDavid PrudeAriel Boone, Vesta Gadarz.

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>>You're listening to KBOO Portland. The time is 5 o'clock. Coming up next is your Friday Evening News. 

 

>>KBOO Radio is a proud cosponsor of Guerillas of Desire booklaunch. With Kevin Van Meter on Thursday, August 10th at 7:30 at Powell's on Hawthorne in Portland. Gorillas of Desire argues that the left is wrong. It's strategies are often based on the assumption that working important people are un-organized or simply uninterested in building a new world. Again, that's Guerillas of Desire booklaunch with Kevin Van Meter on Thursday, August 10th at 7:30 at Powell's Books, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd in Portland. More information can be found at kboo.km on the right side of the home page under community events. 

 

>>KBOO hosts a monthly film series at the Clinton Street theater called KBOO at the Clinton. This month we'll screen the film 'Keep the Hives Alive' on Thursday, August 10th at 7pm. Bees and other pollinators are declining at an alarming rate and an overwhelming number of scientific studies link these population declines to pesticide use. 'Keep the Hives Alive' is a documentary film that shows the use toxics and pesticides are having far reaching impacts on the [unintelligible] environments, including beehives. Again, that's a film screening of the documentary 'Keep the Hives Alive' Thursday, August 10th at 7pm at the Clinton Street theater. 2522 SE Clinton Street in Portland. More information can be found at kboo.fm on the right side of the home page under community events.

 

>>This program is made possible by members and support from beloved. The open air Sacred Art and Music festival happening Friday, August 11th to Monday the 14th. Now celebrating ten years! Located at the Oregon coastal forest venue about one hour west of Corvallis. Beloved festival weaves together a weekend-long musical story plus workshops, yoga, craft improved vendors and camping. To get some info, belovedfestival.com. Coming up next is your Friday KBOO Evening News.

 

>>And now, your daily volunteer produced community newscast, the KBOO Evening News.

 

>>Coming up on the KBOO Evening News yesterday's supporters and opponents of Ted Wheeler's Proposed Commission on community engaged policing squared off in city hall. 

 

>>The joint office for homelessness has announced a temporary halt to homeless sweeps during the current heatwave. 

 

>>Over the last couple of days, Portland's air quality has been the worst in the nation. 

 

 

>>Good evening, this is the KBOO Evening News for Friday, August 4th 2017. I'm Reuben Lawrence.

>>And I'm Linda Olsen-OsterlundBeijing has long had the reputation for some of the world's most poluted air, but according to Oregon's Environmental Quality department, this week Portland has the dubious honor of having the worst air quality in the United States. Even worse than in Beijing. Early in the week, the department warned that the air quality was unhealthy for children, senior citizens and people with respiratory diseases. Yesterday, they expanded that warning to unhealthy for everyone. The increased pollution is primarily the result of forest fires that are blazing across British Columbia. The foul air is also coinciding with a record heat wave throughout the Pacific Northwest. Temperatures were in the high 90s early in the week and set records of 103 on Wednesday and 105 yesterday. Forecasters say that the worst of the heat wave is over, but daytime highs will probably continue in the mid-90s for the next week or so. A drop to 95 is not what most Portlanders would refer to as a cooling trend. Along with the lower temperatures, forecasters predict that an increase in westerly winds will start blowing out some of that smoke. 

 

>>Mayor Ted Wheeler's plan for a new commission to promote an improved relationship between police and the community came under attack at yesterday's city council meeting. The Mayor, who also serves as the Portland police commissioner, raised concerns that it would cut the rest of the city council out of any oversight role. KBOO's Ray Bodwell has this report. 

 

>>Both opponents and supporters of Mayor Ted Wheeler's proposed Portland commission on community engaged policing squared off over several hours of testimony in city hall yesterday. Wheeler proposed the PCCEP as replacement for the now defunct Community Oversight Advisory Board. The COAB was formed as a result of the city's settlement agreement with the US Department of Justice in 2012. That settlement stemmed from a federal investigation that found police engaged in a pattern of using excessive force against people with mental illness. Many in the audience were concerned by the suggestion that the PCCEP would be made up of 5 to 9 members that would be chosen by the Mayor. And that they would meet twice a month behind closed doors, thereby effectively cutting the community out of the oversight process. In response to a question from Commissioner Eudaly, Nicole Grant the Mayor's senior policy advisor provided her interpretation of oversight. 

 

>>[audio recording]: So, one of the things-the areas of consensus that we reached with the AMAC, PPA and DOJ during a facilitated-facilitated, excuse me, discussions was the definition of 'oversight'. To review and make recommendations. That said, I think-you know, from the common understanding of oversight is to 'oversee' something. COAB was never intended to be a monitoring body. And I that's the rub. And so if the question is 'will PCCEP be an additional monitor?', no. PCCEP will not be a monitor. 

 

>>The reverend Allen Bethalchair of the Albina Ministerial Alliance expressed concern of an officer's ability to postpone or avoid testimony about a shooting. 

 

>>[audio recording]: Individuals are losing their lives at the hands of officer involved shootings that are always justified and no discipline is ever seen to be given to those persons for what they are doing. 

 

>>But Constantine Severe, director of the city's Independent Police Review Board, said that he was personally ashamed that it took investigators 6 weeks to get around to interviewing the Portland Police officers that were involved in the shooting of Terrell Johnson on May 10th, and he urged that adoption of the Marish proposal. 

 

>>[audio recording]: The concerns that I have about the current deadly force investigation process is that we now have a process where we can be weeks, months, possibly years before the city as the employer of the officer, being able to interview that employee about what occured. That is something that violates the public trust, and I support the Mayor's uhm, resolution.

 

>>Before the meeting concluded, Commissioner Amanda Fritz and Commissioner Chloe Eudaly proposed amendments to the plan and it's unclear what the next steps are. For KBOO, this is Ray Rodwell. 

 

 

>>A new care coordination model is helping Oregon's tribal members to access the healthcare they have been promised from Care Oregon. Eric Tegethoff of the Oregon News Service has this report.

 

>>A new care coordination model is helping Oregon's tribal members access the healthcare they have been promised. This week, Care Oregon started its program for Native Americans in the Oregon healthplan Fee for Service program and developed it with 9 federally recognized tribes in the state, as well as the Native American Rehabilitation Association. Sharon Stanfill, help operations officer for the Cow Creek band of Umpqua tribe of Indians says tribal members usually pick and choose care venues from a number of options. But options can be limited especially for rural tribal members looking for specialized care.

 

>>[audio recording]: Care Oregon is really breaking down some of those barriers to helpcare delivery and these are barriers that shouldn't be happening for tribal members in Oregon. 

 

>>Stanfill says this new model will help coordinate transportation and social service needs and will provide culturally appropriate services for Oregon's Native American population. Jackie Mercer, CEO of the Native American Rehabilitation Association says this program is going to change lives and help tribal members get the best care they can. Mercer says there are many health desparities in native communities, including higher rates of diabetes, alchoholism and a suicide rate for young adults that has nearly doubled in national average. But Mercer notes these health gaps shouldn't lead to the stereotyping of Native Americans. 

 

>>[audio recording]: We're not the diseases, we're not the disparities, we're just people trying to make our best way in this world. So investing in native people has cemented positive outcomes. 

 

>>Aaron Fair Taylorexecutive director legal affairs at Care Oregon says people can't participate in this program without any changes to the providers they currently see. 

 

>>[audio recording]: This program won't require that they change providers, it simply is a resource for people who may not know where to go, who may not know what next steps might be for accessing the care that they need. They can call us and we can help navigate this with them on their behalf. 

 

>>For Oregon News Service, I'm Eric Tegethoff.

 

 

>>The Multnomah County Joined Office for Homelessness has announced a temporary halt to homeless sweeps during the current heat wave. With temperatures consistantly above 90 degrees, the authorities said that cleanup crews will only be targeting camps that are in, quote, "dangerous right-of-ways," end quote. Otherwise they will not be asking most people to move so they can remain shaded and save energy. A number of homeless Portlanders lost their lives during this winderous period of extreme cold, and the city has asked residents to treat the heat wave with the same urgency as an extreme cold snap. Heat might not seem quite as dangerous but the homeless are still vulnerable to heat stroke and exhaustion. Outreach works carrying extra water, and asked residents to be on the lookout for anyone suffering signs of heat stroke or heat related distress. Call 211 if you see someone not in immediate danger but who needs a ride to a cooling center or other help. If you see someone in medical distress, you are urged to call 911. 

 

 

>>Today's report from Climate Connections looks at 'Game of Floods', a board game designed to have students confront real climate change risks. Anthony Leiserowitz of the Yale Climate Center has this report.

 

>>I'm Doctor Anthony Leiserowitz, and this is Climate Connections. 

>>Imagine it's the year 2050, and you're the city planner of an island is threatened by sea level rise and storms. That's the scenario in 'Game of Floods', a board game in which students and community members confront these real climate change risks. 

 

>>[audio recording]: We are particularly excited about bringing it to schools as we feel that it's critical that the youth of today understands this challenge that they're faced with.

 

>>That's Alex Westoff, with the Marin County Community Development Agency  in California, which developed the game. Players must decide how to protect the island from random floods and ever-rising sea levels. Some players decide to move their roads out of vulnerable areas like wetlands. While others choose to protect their buildings with sea walls. For every choice, there are costs. Some financial, some social, and some environmental. 

 

>>[audio recording]: This was intended to purely teach people about what the different strategies are in a way that's engaging and fun.

 

>>Westoff says so far more than a thousand people have played 'Game of Floods', and anyone who wants to try it out for themselves can download the board for free. Then print it and play. 

 

>> Climate Connections is produced by the Yale Center for Environmental Communication. Learn more at yaleclimateconnections.org. 

 

 

>>The man that most people call the most hated man in America was found guilty by a jury in Brooklyn earlier today. Martin Screllythe former head of Touring Pharmaceuticals, was found guilty of two counts of security fraud, and one count of conspiracy to lie to investigators. Prosecutors say that he cheated investors out of nearly eleven billion dollars between 2009 and 2014. Screlly earned nationwide scorn two years ago when he suddenly and unapologetically raised the price of a life-saving AIDS drug from 13 dollars and 50 cents per pill to 750 dollars per pill. Barely an hour after the verdict, he was livestreaming on YouTube from his apartment holding a beer and predicting that descendants would be quote, "close to nil," end quote. He said that if he does go to prison, it will probably be a 'club fad' where he will 'play basketball and tennis and Xbox for a couple of months,' 

 

 

>>You are listening to the KBOO Evening News. Stay tuned for counter spin at 5:30, followed by Bed and Roses at 6. At 7 it's Hard Knock Radio, news and views from the hip hop perspective. Tomorrow's weather calls for another hot day with temperature's reaching the mid-90s. There should be some improvement in air quality. East of the Cascades in Hood River, will be even hotter with temperatures nearing 100. On this day in 1956, Elvis Presley released the single 'Hound Dog'. Presley had his band record 31 takes of this song and finally settled on take number 28. The song had orginally been a hit for Big Mama Thorton in 1953. The quote of the day is from Bruce Springsteen who said quote, "Elvis is my religion, but for him I'd be selling encyclopedias right now," end quote. 

 

 

>> President Trump faced yet another backlash this week after allogations came out that he described the White House as quote, "a real dump," end quote, to fellow golfers at his golf club in New Jersey. Trump called the report 'fake news' but according to The Guardian at least 8 or 9 members and staff members heard him say it. Former White House photographer, Pete Souza responded on Instagram with a picture of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in the Lincoln Bedroom. He described the White House as a 'historic building' and as a 'place that no American should ever call a dump'. Chelsea Clinton also tweeted a thank you to the White House staff for the work they do every day to keep the president's home in tip-top shape and not a dump. 

 

>>According to the publication 'The Hill', more than 50 Democrats are now calling on the Pentagon to refuse compliance with President Trump's ban on transgender troops. They've cited the ban as unconstitutional. While the President has certainly made statements alluting to a proposed ban, the Pentagon has not yet received any official directive. Defense Secretary General Maddis was described as being quote, 'appalled' when he was first informed of the tweet. He had already authorized a six month review to determine whether or not transgendered service members do in fact effect the readiness of the military. Currently the military has no official policy concerning transgendered service members, but even in the face of Trump's tweets, taught military officials continue to voice their support for all service members. 

 

 

>>And now it's time for today's report from National Native News with Art Hughes. 

 

>>This is National Native News, I'm Art Hughes Infer Antonio GonzalezA federal appeals court this week upheld the domestic assault conviction against a citizen of the Northern Cheyenne tribe in Montana. Lion Semanal appealed his conviction saying the victim, his common-law wife, should not have been compelled to testify against him. His attorneys argued spousal privilege should protect his wife's wishes to not take the stand. Assistant US Attorney Brian Dake argued the case last month before the 9th US district court of appeals, he said hearing the victim's testimony is an important part of enforcing the provisions added to the Violence Against Women Act in 2013 that Semanal was convicted of. 

 

>>[audio recording]: The Violence Against Women Act as this court has noted before, there is a grave problem of domestic violence in Indian country. Grave problem with vulnerable victims. The United States government has an interest in successful prosecutions in order to combat this problem. This is something that is neccessary for the government, it's neccessary for the victims and it's neccessary for the community. And it's in line with hundreds of years of of president. 

 

>>The three judge panel ruled unanimously that Semanal's conviction should stand saying domestic abuse victims are notoriously succeptable to intimidation and coercion from abusers. The wife of the former Standing Rock tribal official conviction of sexually abusing a young girl signed a plead deal for her role in the crime. The Bismark Tribune reports Ronda Crine Full-Bear agreed to plead guilty for not reporting her husband's ongoing sexual abuse. Robert Full-Bear was convicted in April for repeated sexual abuse that started when the victim was 10 years old. He is scheduled for sentencing later this month. Here is the former district chairman in Cannonball on the Standing Rock reservation, his wife knew of the abuse but failed to report it, she eventually made an anonymous phone call to police that culminated in his arrest. 

Navahoe Nation officials say the superintendent for Navahoe headstart is off the job after federal officials ordered an investigation for alleged misconduct and misuse of funds. The Farmington Daily Times reports the investigation involves two years of Sharon Singer's ten-year at Shonto Preparatory School in Arizona. Singer's attorney tells the paper she intends to file a grievance with the Navahoe Nation Department of Personnel Management. 

Vandalism prompted officials to paint over a mural memorializing a murdered Navahoe girl. The Farmington Daily Times reports the mural was painted in May of last year on the walls of a tunnel on a Navahoe Nation road. It was in honor of 11 year old Ashlin Mike who was abducted and murdered. It included her first name and images of things she liked when she was alive, but it was recently vandalized with what police say are gang related symbols and offensive images. An upper Fruitland Chapter official tells the paper, 'leaders and community members will discuss other options for memorializing Ashlin. The man charged in the crimes, Tom Begay, pleaded guilty this week to first-degree murder, kidnapping and other charges. 

Colorado elected officials say EPA chief Scott Pruitt is expected to join them for a tour Friday of the gold mine that was the source of a three million gallon toxic waste spill two years ago. Pruitt is on a swing through Colorado to meet with coal industry representatives and state officials, Colorado's governor, two senators and at least one other congressional representative are also touring the facility. They intend to hold a public town hall meeting in Durango. 

EPA workers caused the release of sludge from the Gold King mine on August 5th 2015. The waste contained heavy metals and other toxins that contaminated the the Animus River and the San Juan River that flows through the Navahoe Nation. The EPA contributed to more than 600 thousand dollars to offset clean-up costs, but the tribe sued the agency last year saying it failed adequately remediate the spill. 

With National Native News, I'm Art Hughes.

 

 

>>National Native News is produced at the Annenberg National Native Voice Studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico by Koahnic Broadcast Corporation, with offices in Anchorage, Alaska. Funding is provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Annenberg Foundation and the Ford Foundation. 

 

>>And by Humboldt State University, we know what it means to be rooted in community. You can get your masters in social work and amplify your voice without to to leave it. The part-time online program accepts applications between August 1st and 31st. More at humboldt.edu/socialwork.

 

>>Support by BNSF railway, proud partners of the American Indian Science and Education Society's national conference September 21st to 23rd. Helping prepare the next generation of stem leaders. More at bnsf.com/tribalrelations.

 

>>Native Voice One. The native american radio service. 

 

>>NASA wants you to protect Earth alien life. Should you accept this dangerous mission, it comes with a six-figure salary and the coveted title of Planetary Protection Officer. While this may sound like something out of a movie, the current Officer, Dr. Kathryn Conley says her mission is really is actually quite down-to-earth. Her job has many responsibilities, perhaps the most important is insuring future NASA missions don't bring Earth-ly contaminants to planets like Mars or vice-versa. Strict requirements like this are the reason NASA will be destroying the Cassini spacecraft in September. They want to avoid potentially contaminating Saturn's moons which may have liquid water. Sound like the job for you? Well if you have an advanced degree in Physics, Engineering or Math and a security clearance it just might be. And Dr. Conely pointed out that one of the job's perks was a pair of quote, "men-in-black style sunglasses". 

 

 

>>Israeli police have confirmed that Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is currently under investigation in two seperate cases of criminal allogations of fraud, breach of trust and bribery. Netanyahu's former Chief of Staff and Confidant Ari Harow has been found guilty of breach of trust charges as well. He was fined nearly $200,000 and was sentenced to 6 months of community service. As part of the sentencing agreement, Harow has agreed to testify against Netanyahu in these investigations. The first investigation focuses on the charges that the prime minister has a history of accepting lavish gifts from businessmen. The second case involves allogations that Natanyahu worked with Israeli news publishers to back his legislation and weaken the support of his competitors. Natanyahu denied any wrongdoing, and said that investigators were trying to bring down his government. Likud Party spokesperson David Baton said quote, "The prime minister does not need to resign, rather he needs to prove his innocence," end quote. 

 

 

>>And now we hear the latest from worker related news from our friends at laborradio.org.

 

>>You're listening to WIN, Workers Independent News,  a diversified media enterprises production. 

 

>>For WIN, I am Joann Powers. As automaker Tesla is moving to ramp up production for its new Model 3 electric car and hire thousands more workers at its Fremont, California facility, workers are mobilizing to form a union afiliated with the United Auto Workers. The Tesla Workers Organizing Committee sent a letter to the company's board of directors this week with several demands. The workers are calling for voice and safety policies as well as issues of rotation schedules, equipment and ergonomics. Committee member Michael Sanchez has worked at the Fremont facility for 5 years. 

 

>>You're doing three jobs with one person, twelve hours a day six days a week. It becomes wear and tear on your body. I'm going to end up having surgery on September 26th because of two hernias in the skin of my neck for having to lift up for four plus years. 

 

>>The workers are also concerned about the lack of a transparent process through which workers are evaluated and promoted, and are calling for the company to cease anti-union activities. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has taken a position against unionization efforts and Sanchez says Tesla is currently using intimidation against workers. 

 

>>If you try and go to assemble a union that there's going to be backlash. That you're going to lose your job or lose your opportunity to get a lead position or more. That's not how it should work. We are going to be a UAW. But workers in that factory are in the UAW. We're a union, there's not going to be a third party. We are the party. We want a contract because the fact is that you go out there and you bust your butt everyday all those hours and you can't get a raise even though you've earned it. If you have a contract and you put your time and you put your effort and you show what you can do, that's a guaranteed raise. That's a guaranteed opportunity to move up. When we have contracts, that's where we have equal opportunity and we know that's how we know that our careers are only just going to go up. 'Cause right now we're all at a standstill. They have a future in the automotive industry so why are you forgetting about the people that are getting you there? 

 

>>On Tuesday, a federal judge rejected a challenge a Seattle law allowing drivers for ride-sharing companies to form a union and collectively bargain over wages and working conditions. The challenge was brought by the US Chamber of Commerce representing ride-share companies Uber and Lyft. However, the 25th team loss still remains blocked until the judge can rule on a seperate lawsuit from drivers backed by conservative anti-union groups. misclassified as 'independent contracters', the drivers are not currently covered under the federal National Labor Relations Act. If the law goes into effect, Teamsters local 117 has already obtained permission from the city to begin organizing drivers. 

 

 

>>Brought to you by the IBEW, 725 thousand men and women powering the way for an American comeback. Information for how to become an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Power professional, it is online at ibew.org.

 

>>You've been listening to WIN, Workers Independent News. For more information, visit workersindependentnews.com. 

 

 

>>An LGBT center in Australia has added a black and brown stripe to their pride flag to honor its aboriginal and idigneous queer people. But the move itself was actually inspired from a place from the other side of the planet, Philadelphia. Activists in Phili recently added similar stripes on their version of the flag to show respect to people of color within the fight for queer rights. Some people in the US have taken exceptions to this move stating that it highlights more division. But the aussies disagree. Margaret Handsford, a board member at the Australian center notes that aboriginal and idigenous LGBT people still face severe oppression and discrimination. And she wants their flag to have a special greeting for them. 

 

 

>>You're listening to the KBOO Evening News. This is a volunteer-produced newscast and we encourage your participation. Call us with your breaking news stories at 503-231-8032. Our production team for tonights newscast is Fox Wild, Isabel Cochran and Kunsel Dolma. The producer is Ray Bodwell. Our engineer is Jenna YokoyamaAnd the KBOO Evening News and Public Affairs director is Zeloszelos Marchandt. A podcast of this newscast is available on our website at kboo.fm/eveningnews. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter at KBOO News. You're listening to KBOO Portland on 90.7 FM, K282BH Philomath on 104.3 FM, and K220HR Hood River on 91.9 FM. I'm Linda Olson-Osterlund

 

>>And I'm Reuben Lawrence. Coming up Monday morning on KBOO at 7 it's Democracy Now with Amy Goodman and Wan Gonzalez. At 8, it's More Talk Radio and a visit from Portland's resistance to discuss all the changes happening with the Portland Police Bureau and their search for a new Chief. At 9, the Old Mole Variety Hour burrows down to the great issues of our time and goes where corporate media fears to tread. At 10, Locus Focus revisits Barbara Bernstein's 2002 documentary, 'Rivers That Were'. Exploring the consequences of redesigning nature to fit commercial needs. At 11 on HealthWatch, Dr. Marilyn Glenville has a 7-step brain protection plan in her book, 'Natural Solutions for Dementia and Alzheimers', the ultimate guide to prevent short-term memory loss. And at 11:30, it's Madness Radio, voices and visions from outside mental health. KBOO keeps you informed and involved and we need your help. Go to kboo.fm, and click on 'Donate' to become a member today. Goodnight Linda.

 

>>Goodnight Reuben! Goodnight Jenna. 

 

>>Goodnight everybody. 

 

[End of transcript.]

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