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30 years gone

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 So CBS News Sunday Morning, in honor of its 30th birthday, conducted a poll using the same questions used by the CBS News/New York Times poll (and some other sources) 30 years ago.

Some of the results were pretty interesting.

 

 

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR NEWS? 

CBS/NYT L.A. Times Poll  

Now  12/1979 

Television   60%  41% 

Newspapers   14  42 

Internet   13  n/a 

Radio     7  11 

Magazines    1   2 

Talking to people  4   3 

 

Note the "n/a" next to Internet in 1979.

 

HOMOSEXUAL RELATIONS BETWEEN ADULTS 

      CBS/NYT Gallup 

      Now  11/1978 

Wrong   41%  62

Not wrong  54  25

 

There it is, in black and white. A majority of Americans now accept homosexuality as a normal state of affairs. Progress!

 

Progress on health care, too.

 

 

 

 HEALTH INSURANCE:  PRIVATE ENTERPRISE VS. GOVERNMENT? 

CBS/NYT CBS/NYT 

Now  1/1979 

Private enterprise  32%  48% 

Government – all problems 49  28 

Government – emergencies 10  12 

Don’t know     9  12 

 

A clear majority of Americans favor government-provided health care, at least in emergencies, and a near-majority favors it in all cases.

 

Take a look at the whole poll. It's an interesting three-decade snapshot.

 

-A

 

February 14 - Playlist Spotlight

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An Evening of Afrotainment is dedicated to bringing you music from Black artists worldwide who cross all genres of music.  We do our best to present music that makes you listen, think and reflect as we slip and slide aurally through the spectrum of the Black experience often described as "Soul" music.  Soul music is best known for blending gospel and R&B.

Revolutionaries Guided by Great Love

Well, it's the day before Valentine's Day, and my thoughts have turned towards love; after all, love is the strongest force in the universe.  Love is integral to profound social change work.  As we work together to build the world anew, love informs our visions and fuels our actions.  If we want to live in a world that holds the values of love, truth and beauty as central tenets of our creed, then we must open to love here and now, with each other and ourselves.

Of course it was Che Guevara who said, "At the risk of sounding ridiculous, let me say that the true revolutionary is guided by feelings of love."

Which is not unlike Buddha saying, "The thought manifests as the word. The word manifests as the deed. The deed develops into habit. And the habit hardens into character. So watch the thought and its ways with care. And let it spring from love, born out of concern for all beings."

So what does a world that values love and compassion look like? As we envision, manifest and build the world, how do we reflect love and compassion both in the making and in the result?

Punk'd?

Hmm. So after a resounding electoral victory, an inauguration the likes of which we've never seen, and an odd new empathic burst of shared purpose, President Obama did what now?

He followed Bush's lead on civil liberties.

 

Obama Administration Maintains Bush Position on 'Extraordinary Rendition' Lawsuit

The Obama Administration today announced that it would keep the same position as the Bush Administration in the lawsuit Mohamed et al v Jeppesen Dataplan, Inc.

A source inside of the Ninth U.S. District Court tells ABC News that a representative of the Justice Department stood up to say that its position hasn't changed, that new administration stands behind arguments that previous administration made, with no ambiguity at all. The DOJ lawyer said the entire subject matter remains a state secret.

It's because of that last item I listed above -- that sense of shared purpose, of belief that all of us are going to get pointed in the right direction -- that this stings so much. "Extraordinary rendition" was one of the most galling of the Bush junta's excesses. Ashcroft, Gonzales & Co. had relied upon "state secrets" privilege to prevent courts from ruling on cases like Mohamed, in which five plaintiffs had been forcibly deported to other countries (we still don't know where) and tortured.

On one of its first chances to turn away from the dark side, the Obama administration has stepped right in the footprints set down by Bush. "State secrets" still prevent the tortured from having their day in court. It's a disgrace.

The only hope I hold out -- and it's a thin one -- is that the situation around rendition is as convoluted as that surrounding the prosecutorial cases for the Guantanamo detainees. Perhaps on this issue, too, the Bushies left such a scorched landscape in their wake that the Obama Justice Dept. is having trouble making head or tail of what went on in the course of "extraordinary rendition." Perhaps they will do the right thing and revisit Mohamed again down the road.

I hope so. I hope Obama is not the Manchurian candidate I feared he might be.

H/T Glenn Greenwald

racism and the economic crisis

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For The Old Mole February 9, 2009.

Racism is arguably both a cause and a consequence of the current economic crisis.

Bread and Roses Feb 6 Show: Interview w/creators of We've Got Time To Help

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Bridget B. here, the interview with Seth Reams and Michelle King, the creators of We've Got Time To Help, was well received.  This segment of Bread and Roses, engineered by Brooke Kavanaugh, started, as always, at 6pm and ended at 7pm.  Here's the email that Seth and Michelle sent within an hour or so of leaving the station.

RIP: Lux Interior

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I am very sad.



Cramps Frontman Lux Interior R.I.P. [Pitchfork]

The Long & Dusty Road 02.04.09

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Wayfaring Stranger (Hobart Smith, In Sacred Trust: The 1963 Fleming Brown Tapes)
The Farmer's Daughter (The Dickel Brothers, Dickel Bros. Vol. 1)
Life Worth Living (Uncle Tupelo, No Depression)
Magnolia Blossums In The Breeze (Baby Gramps, Baptized on Swamp Water: Tribute to New Orleans)
Last Word (Victoria Williams, Musings of A Creek Dipper)
You Don't Know My Mind (Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Will the Circle Be Unbroken)

Breaking Down Poverty's Barriers: An Interview with Dr. Donna Beegle

Poverty is more than a lack of resources. It creates barriers that isolate the poor from the rest of the community and from opportunities to break free from its grip. That isolation also extends to having a voice in research and program development for breakding down poverty's barriers.

Dr. Donna M. Beegle, a national expert on poverty, grew up in a migrant labor family. At 15 she dropped out of school, married, and after ten years of abject poverty became a homeless divorced mother with two children. Through a pilot program that helped her gain self-confidence as well as connections to resources and mentors, she returned to school, eventually achieving a doctorate in educational leadership. For the past 17 years she has conducted research on poverty, authored See Poverty...Be the Difference, and founded the non-profit PovertyBridge to work directly with people impacted by poverty. On March 7, she will be holding an "Opportunity Conference" with 200 Portlanders living in poverty. Her own experience with poverty is part of a PBS documentary, Invisible Nation which will air later this year.

Join Jo Ann and Dave this Thursday as they discuss with Dr. Beegle how to reach across the barriers of poverty to build a more equitable Portland. Can't call in during the program? Send us your questions for Dr. Beegle in advance through the comments section of this blog!

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